History Of Electoral College Results

Listing Results History of electoral college results


Preview

Electoral College Results. *** More results will be added as OFR continues to update this website. ***. * Election notes include specific election information, such as third party candidates, faithless electors, challenges during the counting of the electoral votes in Congress, and other interesting facts. Learn more about the history of the

See Also: Why we should keep the electoral college  Show details


Preview

Electoral College History How did we get the Electoral College? The Founding Fathers established the Electoral College in the Constitution, in part, as a compromise between the election of the President by a vote in Congress and election of the President by a popular vote of qualified citizens.

See Also: Explain the electoral college for dummies  Show details


Preview

55 rows · During the electoral vote count, objections were filed with respect to …

Electoral Vote: Winner: 306
President: Joseph R. Biden Jr. [D]
Main Opponent: Donald J. Trump [R]
Vice President: Kamala D. Harris [D]

See Also: Why electoral college was created  Show details


Preview

Historical Presidential Elections. Through 2020, there have been 59 presidential elections. This page links to the results of those historical elections, including a larger map, results and synopsis of the race. An interactive version of each map is also available, letting you change history. To view maps and results from all prior presidential

See Also: Simple explanation of electoral college  Show details


Preview

Support for Electoral College reform in the years after 1970 remained very strong, and the reform effort was invigorated by the 1976 election. Jimmy Carter won the 1976 election by a narrow margin in the Electoral College (although he clearly won the popular vote), and that kicked up fears again of getting a “wrong” winner.

See Also: Electoral college results by year  Show details


Preview

Such critics question whether the Electoral College results are truly representative of the people. In five elections in US history—1824, 1876, 1888, 2000, and 2016—candidates who won the popular vote did not win the presidency because they failed to gain a …

See Also: Electoral college votes history  Show details


Preview

The numbers reflect the total electoral votes allocated to the state. Lighter colors appear when the state popular vote winner didn't receive the full number. See the respective historical election for more details. The green line means the state voted …

See Also: Electoral college results all time  Show details


Preview

214 rows · U.S. presidential election results year candidate political party electoral votes 1 …

See Also: It Courses  Show details


Preview

1. The margin of victory in a U.S. presidential election, with the exception below, is the difference between the number of Electoral College votes garnered by the candidate with an absolute majorityof electoral votes (since 1964, it has been 270 out of 538) and the number received by the second place candidate (currently in the range of 2 to 538, a margin of one vote is only possible with an odd total number of electors or a faithless elector). The exception occurs if no candidate receives an a
2. The margin of victory in the election is calculated as follows: Let c be the total number of electors voting in the election. Let w be the number of electoral votes cast for the candidate with the most electoral votes, and let rbe the number of votes for the runner-up. The Constitution provides that if the candidate with the most votes does not receive a simple majority of the electors voting, the House of Representatives chooses the president. So, the margin of victory is the number of elect

See Also: It Courses  Show details


Preview

How many Electoral College votes are needed in order to win the Presidency? Electoral College. DRAFT. 10th - 12th grade. 2294 times. History. 68% average accuracy. a year ago. passam_44794. 4. Save. Edit. Edit. Electoral College DRAFT. a year ago. by passam_44794. Played 2294 times. 4. 10th - 12th grade .

See Also: Free Online Courses  Show details


Preview

The Electoral College is the constitutionally-specified process that the United States uses to elects its President and Vice President. As this brief electoral college history shows, while it roughly tracks the total of votes citizens have cast in a presidential election (popular vote), results can be different.

Estimated Reading Time: 9 mins

See Also: History Courses  Show details


Preview

The House Decides Again: 1825. Since the 12th Amendment, one other presidential election has come to the House. In 1824, Andrew Jackson of Tennessee won a plurality of the national popular vote and 99 votes in the Electoral College—32 short of a majority. John Quincy Adams was runner-up with 85, and Treasury Secretary William Crawford had 41.

See Also: Free Online Courses  Show details


Preview

The peculiar system that emerged was the Electoral College. Right from the get-go, the Electoral College has produced no shortage of lessons about the impact of racial entitlement in selecting the president. History buffs and Hamilton fans are aware that in its first major failure, the Electoral College produced a tie between Thomas Jefferson

See Also: Free Online Courses  Show details


Preview

U.S. presidential election results year candidate political party electoral votes 1 popular votes 2 popular percentage 3; 1 In elections from 1789 to 1804, each elector voted for two individuals without indicating which was to be president and which was to be vice president.: 2 In early elections, electors were chosen by legislatures, not by popular vote, in many states.

See Also: It Courses  Show details


Preview

1. Electors. Most states require that all electoral votes go to the candidate who receives the most votes in that state. After state election officials certify the popular vote of each state, the winning slate of electors meet in the state capital and cast two ballots—one for Vice President and one for President.
2. Procedure. /tiles/non-collection/i/i_electoral_college_frankleslies_electoralvote1881_2007_292_002-1.xml In the 1880 presidential election, James Garfield narrowly won the popular vote but swept the Electoral College in the Midwest and Northeast.
3. Objections. /tiles/non-collection/i/i_electoral_college_electoralcount1913_2008_069_000_1.xml The House and Senate met in a Joint Session on February 12, 1913, to count Electoral College votes for the 1912 presidential election.
4. Amending the Process. Originally, the Electoral College provided the Constitutional Convention with a compromise between two main proposals: the popular election of the President and the election of the President by Congress.
5. Contingent Elections. In the case of an Electoral College deadlock or if no candidate receives the majority of votes, a “contingent election” is held. The election of the President goes to the House of Representatives.

See Also: Free Online Courses  Show details


Preview

It was the only time in U.S. history that small state support has decided an election. 1888: Benjamin Harrison lost the popular vote by 95,713 votes to Grover Cleveland, but won the electoral vote by 65. In this instance, some say the Electoral College worked the way it is designed to work by preventing a candidate from winning an election

Estimated Reading Time: 4 mins

See Also: Free Online Courses  Show details


Preview

The Electoral College website now has an easy-to-remember address. Make sure to update your bookmarks! The Office of the Federal Register does not have official ties to these websites and is not responsible for their content or their maintenance. Voting Can I Vote?—find out if you’re registered to vote and more U.S. Election Assistance …

Estimated Reading Time: 40 secs

See Also: Free Online Courses  Show details

Please leave your comments here:

Related Topics

New Online Courses

Frequently Asked Questions

What is the history of the Electoral College??

The History of the Electoral College. The compromise that they came up with was to allow each state to select their own electors who would vote for the president. Each state got a number of electors equal to the number of representatives that they had in the House of Representative, plus two more, representing their senators.

What are the advantages and disadvantages of the Electoral College??

The primary advantage of the electoral college is its ability to simplify elections; its primary disadvantage is inequalities among different states. Despite its waning popularity, states are unlikely to ever support a constitutional amendment abolishing the electoral college. The...

What was the original Electoral College??

The Original Electoral College Design. We do find the following in the definitions of the words electoral def and college def in Noah Webster’s 1828 dictionary: ELECTORAL Pertaining to election or electors. The electoral college in Germany consisted of all the electors of the empire, being nine in number, six secular princes and three archbishops.

Why is the Electoral College bad??

Popular Search